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Breed profiles: Maltipoo Dogs and Hairless Cats

Posted by Annette Filecci
Annette Filecci
Hi, my name is Annette Filecci. I am a Miami native, one of the few! I have been pet sitting in the Hollywood,...
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on Friday, 18 January 2013
in Lucky Dogs News & Views

The Maltipoo

Maltipoo

A cross-breeding of the Maltese and a Toy or Miniature Poodle produces these adorable little dogs, and Maltipoos look like puppies even when they are full grown. They are affectionate and playful right up into old age (teen years). Their coats may be either scruffy like the Maltese or curly like the Poodle’s, and white or cream are the most common colors.

MaltipooCrossbred puppies often look very different from one another — even within the same litter — and can resemble either one (or neither!) of their parents. The Maltipoo is typically very small, averaging about ten pounds, and may enjoy barking quite a bit; which makes them a good choice as watchdogs. Friendly with children and other dogs, they can be easily overwhelmed and even injured by rough play.

MaltipooThese little dogs love to go for walks and play fetch with balls and other toys. They are also very trainable and love to perform tricks for their delighted audiences. Indoors or out, they are a compact package of fun, but they are somewhat delicate due to their small stature so they should never be left outdoors as a general rule.

Grooming needs vary depending on the type of coat, but all Maltipoos will need daily brushing; and the curlier Poodle coat requires professional grooming every 4-6 weeks. You can learn to use clippers and do the job yourself, but it must be done, because without proper grooming a Maltipoo's coat becomes a matted mess which can result in painful skin infections at the roots of their hair.

There’s no need to pay big bucks for a Maltipoo: you can adopt one from an animal shelter or breed rescue organization. Social media can help too! Post a message on your Facebook page, and your entire network can help you look for that fur-ever friend.



Hairless Cats

 

Did you know that there are several breeds of hairless cats? The Donskoy is the oldest, and ancestor to many of them, but there is a growing variety of these curious creatures.

Donskoy The Donskoy is also known as the Russian Hairless, Don Hairless, or Don Sphynx. Often mistaken for a Sphynx, their hairlessness gene is dominant whereas the Sphynx’s is recessive. This means their offspring will be more consistent.

SphynxThe Sphynx, which originated in Canada in 1966 from a single hairless kitten named Prune, is a relatively new breed, although hairless cats have been around for centuries. At first glance they seem to be completely naked, but you will find that the Sphynx actually sports a very fine, fuzzy coat of hair.

Elf CatThe Elf Cat is a hybrid cross of the American Curl and Sphynx cats. They have ears that curl back into “points” which gives them their elfish appearance. This cat has an athletic and muscular body resembling that of the Sphynx. Also like the Sphynx, Elf cats have prominent cheek bones and whisker pads. Whiskers and eyebrows, if they have them at all, are sparse and very short.

Levkoy CatThe Levkoy Cat, which has droopy ears, comes from the Ukraine, and was developed by breeding a kitty with folded ears with a Sphynx. Their name is believed to come from the Levkoy plant whose leaves resemble this feline's distinctive folded ears.

Bambino CatThe Bambino is a hairless cat with short legs, the offspring of a Munchkin Cat and a Sphynx. A hairless, short cat with an athletic appearance; they are gentle but lively, and very affectionate. Bambinos are intelligent and friendly, one of the more “cuddly” cats: very interactive and social.

Peterbald CatThe Peterbald is a hybrid of the Russian Hairless and an Oriental Shorthair. They have a number of distinctice characteristics including a long narrow head, webbed feet and long rat-like whip of a tail. This cat sports a graceful, long body and engaging personality. Their coats range from totally smooth bald skin to a velour texture or an odd, short, brushy coat. The Peterbald makes a great companion, because they are very friendly and loving.

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Breed profiles: Jack Russel Terriers and Tonkinese Cats

Posted by Annette Filecci
Annette Filecci
Hi, my name is Annette Filecci. I am a Miami native, one of the few! I have been pet sitting in the Hollywood,...
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on Sunday, 23 December 2012
in Lucky Dogs Breed Profiles

Jack Russell Terrier

Spero, Lucky Dogs Jack RussellThe Jack Russell is an energetic breed of small terrier that was originally bred for fox hunting; to have high stamina for the hunt, as well as the courage to root out foxes that had retreated to their dens. As such these dogs need exercise and stimulation to avoid mood and behavioral problems associated with restlessness and boredom. White-bodied and smooth with a rough or "broken" coat; the reason they are white is because hunters needed to be able to tell their dogs from the prey.

Spero, Lucky Dogs Jack Russells These hardy dogs have not changed much in the past two centuries, and their average lifespan averages 13-16 years. They are instinctively a working dog, and while bred to chase red foxes, they are also used to eliminate numerous ground-dwelling prey such as groundhog, badger, or grey fox. The Jack Russell originated with dogs that were bred and used by Reverend John Russell in the early 1800's and is related to the Fox terrier as well as the now-extinct English White terrier. These dogs have a tempered aggressiveness to allow pursuit and capture of foxes without harming them (which would end the chase, which was considered "unsporting") Reverend Russell reportedly prided himself on the fact that his terriers never tasted blood.

Spero, Lucky Dogs Jack RussellsAfter World War II, there was less need for hunting dogs, so the role of Jack Russells changed. Now they are more commonly chosen as family and companion animals. Cross breeding with Welsh corgis, Chihuahuas and other smaller breeds of terrier has produced breeds known as Puddin' Dogs and Shortie Jacks. Jack Russells are a very popular choice for movies and other types of show, as they are very intelligent, athletic, fearless, and vocal. Nipper was a Jack Russsell who was the inspiration for the painting "Dog looking at and listening to a Phonograph", which was later renamed to "His Master's Voice", and is still in use today as a logo. Another Jack Russell, named Bothy, visited both the North and South Poles; and Chalky was a star on TV in the UK. "Eddie" on the US TV show Frasier was played by two dogs; a father and son named Moose and Enzo, who also played "Skip" in a movie called "My Dog Skip". Wishbone was the subject of a popular children's show, and there are numerous others.

Because of their high energy and drive, Jack Russells are ideal for numerous dog sports; excelling at flyball or agility. However, they can be stubborn at times and even aggressive towards other animals and humans if not properly socialized, so obedience training is highly recommended. They really do have an incredible amount of energy for their size, which can sometimes lead to trouble with larger animals. Apparently tireless, they will often still be energetic after you are worn out. If they are well-socialized, they can be good with children, but they will never tolerate abuse even if it is accidental. Overall, the Jack Russell is a great family pet, and a teriffic companion for those who enjoy an active lifestyle.

Tonkinese cat

Spero, Lucky Dogs TonkineseTonkinese are medium-sized cats which weigh 6-20 lbs or occasionally more. They have distinctive "points" similar to the Siamese and Birman cat breeds: fur markings on the ears, face, back, tail, and paws. Busy, fun, and sometimes talkative; these cats have friendly, outgoing personalities. Commonly known as ‘Tonks’ They have distinctive (usually dark) oval-shaped paws, and a stocky muscular build to their bodies, wedge-shaped heads, and large ears which are set towards the outside of their head. Because they are so muscular, they are sometimes heavier than they appear to be. This breed of cat is an excellent combination of qualities from both the Burmese and the Siamese cats. Tonkinese share attributes from both the Burmese and Siamese including behaviours, so they tend to vocalize like the Siamese are well-nown for doing.

Some claim that the appearance of this breed is more closely resembles the original appearance of Siamese cats, before breeders developed today's exaggerated triangular head and very leggy body. The name Tonkinese has been slightly altered since the breed was first established in Canada. At that time it was actually spelled "Tonkanese," which referenced an island in the musical "South Pacific". Tonkinese have four coat colors and a variety of patterns. The three most common patterns are mink, solid and pointed. Solid is a Burmese coat pattern, and pointed is a Siamese pattern; but Mink is a unique Tonkinese pattern, with shaded "points" like the Siamese, and the body in a shade which tends to compliment the point colour. The most common colors are: platinum, champagne, blue, and natural. Solid Tonkinese cats will usually have gold or blue-green eyes, while cats with the pointed pattern are blue-eyed, and mink cats even have a touch of aquamarine.

Highly intelligent, curious, and great with people, children and other pets; the Tonkinese is unusual in that they will beg for attention and cuddling, reciprocting with loving affection. Enthusiasically playful although not hyperactive, they love toys; including human fingers or the tails of other pets, among other things! Obviously then, they can be mischievous if you let them become too bored or lonely. You can avoid that by providing numerous interesting toys and a cat tree; but if you are not home much, a good solution is to have another Asian cat (Tonkinese, Oriental, Burmese, Siamese, or Snowshoe) to provide companionship and keep them busy. Another unusual attribute is that they will sometimes play "fetch" with you!

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Breed Profile: The Daschund

Posted by Annette Filecci
Annette Filecci
Hi, my name is Annette Filecci. I am a Miami native, one of the few! I have been pet sitting in the Hollywood,...
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on Thursday, 15 November 2012
in Lucky Dogs Breed Profiles

The daschund (German for “badger dog”) is by far one of the most adorable dogs alive, and the AKC consistently lists them among the top ten dog breeds. With their extremely short legs and long bodies, you’d never guess that they were part of the hound family! Developed as hunting dogs to enter the underground burrows of various critters, the standard size daschund was bred to catch larger animals such as badgers while the miniature was bred to go after rabbits primarily, although they have been utilized in the western United States to catch prairie dogs.

Typically long-bodied and muscular, the daschund sports short stubby legs with rather large paws for digging. Their skin is somewhat loose; so it won’t get torn on rough edges in small, tight spaces, as the dog digs for prey. They tend to dig underneath an animal’s burrow so as to catch them by surprise. These tenacious canines have been known to dig a tunnel ten feet long to catch their prey, and digging for three days straight is not unusual when they are excited and eager to perform.


There are three types of daschund, although only two are recognized in the US and UK. Kennel clubs use varying measures to determine type; including weight, height, and chest circumference.
1.   Standard – 16-32 lbs.
2.   Miniature – 12 lbs. or less
3.   Kaninchen (German for “Rabbit Dog”) – 8-11 lbs.

There are three coat varieties for daschunds.
1.   Smooth coat (short hair)
2.   Long hair
3.  Wire hair (least common in US and most common in Germany, most recent coat variety to be acknowledged.

 

 

The colors of daschund coats are black, chocolate, red, and silver; red being the most common. The patterns vary, and these are the types:
1.    Single-colored
2.    Single-colored with spots (also known as dappled or merle)
3.    Single-colored with tan points plus any pattern
4.    Piebald

Listed as clever, lively, and courageous; daschunds are playful but can be stubborn (terrier behavior!) and love to chase prey or a tennis ball for hours on end. Although very loyal, they may be difficult to housebreak and train; as well as aggressive toward other dogs as well as strangers – especially children. They also may or may not bark a lot, and their bark can be quite loud and demanding. They prefer not to be alone, so they will whine if they are confined without a companion; and some may show separation anxiety by chewing up household objects including your shoes! They may also “burrow” in blankets and other unusual places when they are tired or bored.

 

If you live in an apartment or urban environment, daschunds are small and easy to care for relatively speaking. They do not have the space requirements of a larger dog; and many famous people, including two U.S. Presidents have been daschund lovers. Here are some of them:
•    Grover Cleveland
•    John F. Kennedy (actually this dog never made it to the White House)
•    William Randolph Hearst
•    E.B. White
•    Pablo Picasso
•    Andy Warhol


If you are considering a daschund, remember that they can be aggressive with children and strangers, so be prepared to spend considerable time socializing and training your dog. But with the right attention, this dog will be a terrific companion!

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Breed profiles: Samoyed Dogs and Persian Cats

Posted by Annette Filecci
Annette Filecci
Hi, my name is Annette Filecci. I am a Miami native, one of the few! I have been pet sitting in the Hollywood,...
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on Thursday, 30 August 2012
in Lucky Dogs Breed Profiles

Samoyeds

The SamoyedDrawing its name from the nomadic Samoyed people, who came from central Asia to northwestern Siberia; and who used hardy and powerful Spitz dogs for herding as well as protecting the reindeer from Arctic predators, these dogs were treated like family members. The nomads were dependent upon reindeer for their food, and had to move constantly with the foraging herd. The dogs lived in the nomads’ tents to keep the children warm at night. Samoyeds were useful, too, for hauling sleds and boats; and even for hunting bears.

The Samoyed dog breed began to arrive in England sometime in the late 1800s. Queen Alexandra was presented with one of these early imports as a gift, and she heartily began to promote the Samoyed. There are numerous modern-day pedigrees that can be traced back to this dog.

The Samoyed was introduced to the United States in 1906, when the Grand Duke Nicholas of Russia gave it as a gift. At that time, the breed had begun to gain notoriety for its ability to outperform other sled dogs; so much so that in the early 20th century, Samoyed dogs were included in a good number of sled teams undertaking expeditions to the South Pole and Antarctica.

Compact, muscular, and strong; the Samoyed bears a resemblance to Spitz dogs with a fantastic combination of strength, dignity, agility, and grace. These dogs sport a weather-resistant, heavy, double coat comprised of a soft, thick undercoat with a straight outer coat; which glows all silvery like sunkissed snow.

If you are looking for a dog which bonds very closely with its family, the Samoyed is an excellent choice. They tend to be friendly with other pets and strangers. A high-energy dog, Samoyeds can be calm indoors – to a point; as long as you challenge their mischievous, clever minds with daily mental and physical workouts. Otherwise you may find them barking and digging up holes when bored.

The Samoyed typically responds well to training and is, overall, eager to please; but he may be stubborn and want to exert some independence at times. Mild-mannered and playful, a Samoyed makes the perfect companion for active people of all ages who are willing to keep their best friend busy.

Samoyeds have been bred specifically for cold weather, herding, and pulling. Even though they can live outside in cold and temperate climates, who wouldn’t prefer to stay in the house, sharing human companionship? Active and lively, this breed absolutely must have daily exercise; whether it is a jog, long walk or a spirited game. Also, his thick coat must be combed and brushed two or three times each week – daily during the shedding season.

On average the Samoyed has a lifespan of 10 to 12 years. In choosing a well-bred dog, the primary issues to watch out for in ancestors are: progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and diabetes. Minor health issues which may also affect this breed include hypothyroidism, gastric torsion, and cataract. Canine hip dysplasia (CHD) is the most significant health concern .

The "smile" of a Samoyed is formed by a slight upturning at the corners of his mouth. We love Samoyeds, which are hardy working dogs long bred for herding, pulling sleds, and showing. Like many herding breeds, a Samoyed may even instinctively “herd” you, your children and/or other pets!

Persians

Persian CatThe Persian was a popular show breed by 1871, when the first modern cat show was kicked off at the Crystal Palace in London, and it was first registered with the Cat Fanciers Association (CFA) in that same year, which is the year in which the association began keeping records. Her ancestors were first reported in Europe as far back as the 1500s; but were most likely taken there by Roman and Phoenician caravans from Persia and Turkey, according to available documentation.

Persian cats were brought to Italy in the 1600s by an Italian traveler, Pietro della Valle. His manuscript, Viaggi di Pietro della Valle, described the Persian as “a gray cat with long, silky hair”. Nicholas-Claude Fabri de Peiresc, an astronomer imported still more Persian cats from Turkey into France, and later they came to Britain with other travelers. In the early 1900s Blue Persians were all the rage, because Queen Victoria had two of them. Persians are large to medium-sized cats, with a sweet expression on their faces. Well balanced, they have large, round heads, small ears, and relatively short tails. Originally bred with a short muzzle, over time in North America most have a “flat” face. As a result they can fall victim to an unfortunate array of health problems; especially regarding sinuses and breathing. This includes accumulate of dust and debris inside their nostrils, which obviously would make it difficult to breathe.

Their famed long, silky coat actually shimmers; and although the most popular color for Persians is the solid silver variety, there are actually in excess of 80 colors to choose from. These include but are not limited to: black, blue, cream, and smoke.

Persians are highly intelligent and they love to play, but are typically not as curious as other cats. They can also be incredibly still for long stretches. So much so you have to look closely to see if they’re breathing! If you like to relax with a feline pal, this is an excellent kitty to have. An unobtrusive sort, you won’t be likely to have this cat sitting on your hands at the laptop or creeping in between you and your favorite book, but they are happy to receive your affection when you’re free to offer it.

When it comes to maintenance, this is not an easy pet to consider. They require daily grooming for their coats to stay silky smooth and matt-free! Some people like to trim them – especially the rear end, which can get “gooked up” in the litterbox.

Persians were not introduced to North America until the 1800s, at which time they quickly became quite popular. No matter what color they are, you can’t go wrong with such a sweet and friendly cat.

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Happy Fourth of July from Lucky Dogs!

Posted by Annette Filecci
Annette Filecci
Hi, my name is Annette Filecci. I am a Miami native, one of the few! I have been pet sitting in the Hollywood,...
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on Monday, 02 July 2012
in Lucky Dogs News & Views
Summer has arrived, and all of us here at LuckyDogs know how much fun you like to have with your pets when the weather is nice! We just want to make sure you are well-informed, so this month we are sharing articles about 4th of July Pet Safety, Summer Safety Tips, and Natural Prevention/Remedies for Parasites.
Fourth of July Safety Tips from the A.S.P.C.A.

For many people, nothing beats lounging in the backyard or at the beach on the Fourth of July with good friends and family—including the four-legged members of the household. But most animals are terrified of fireworks; and while it may seem like a great idea to reward Rover with scraps from the grill and bring him along to watch fireworks, in reality some festive foods and products can be potentially hazardous to your pets. The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center offers the following tips:


  • Never leave alcoholic drinks unattended where pets can reach them. Alcoholic beverages have the potential to poison pets. If ingested, the animal could become very intoxicated and weak, severely depressed or could go into a coma. Death from respiratory failure is also a possibility in severe cases.
  • Do not apply any sunscreen or insect repellent product to your pet that is not labeled specifically for use on animals. Ingestion of sunscreen products can result in drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive thirst and lethargy. The misuse of insect repellent that contains DEET can lead to neurological problems.
  • Always keep matches and lighter fluid out of your pets’ reach. Certain types of matches contain chlorates, which could potentially damage blood cells and result in difficulty breathing—or even kidney disease in severe cases. Lighter fluid can be irritating to skin, and if ingested can produce gastrointestinal irritation and central nervous system depression. If lighter fluid is inhaled, aspiration pneumonia and breathing problems could develop.
  • Keep your pets on their normal diet. Any change, even for one meal, can give your pets severe indigestion and diarrhea. This is particularly true for older animals who have more delicate digestive systems and nutritional requirements. And keep in mind that foods such as onions, chocolate, coffee, avocado, grapes & raisins, salt and yeast dough can all be potentially toxic to companion animals.
  • Do not put glow jewelry on your pets, or allow them to play with it. While the luminescent substance contained in these products is not highly toxic, excessive drooling and gastrointestinal irritation could still result from ingestions, and intestinal blockage could occur from swallowing large pieces of the plastic containers.
  • Keep citronella candles, insect coils and oil products out of reach. Ingestions can produce stomach irritation and possibly even central nervous system depression. If inhaled, the oils could cause aspiration pneumonia in pets.
  • Never use fireworks around pets! While exposure to lit fireworks can potentially result in severe burns and/or trauma to the face and paws of curious pets, even unused fireworks can pose a danger. Many types contain potentially toxic substances, including potassium nitrate, arsenic and other heavy metals.
  • Loud, crowded fireworks displays are no fun for pets, so please resist the urge to take them to Independence Day festivities. Instead, keep your little guys safe from the noise in a quiet, sheltered and escape-proof area at home.



Natural Alternatives to Keep Your Dog and House Parasite-Free

Fleas and other parasites are rampant this time of year. Did you know that a single flea can drink up to 15 times it's weight in blood each day? Or that heartworms are very common in Florida? What about the fact that up to 15% of commercial potting soil contains roundworm eggs? Parasite prevention can help ensure that your dog or cat is healthy and happy.
  1. Fleas and ticks are blood-drinking parasites that can also transmit serious diseases to pets. Ticks can transmit infections like Lyme disease, and fleas can transmit tapeworms and Bartonella-the bacteria that cause cat-scratch fever in humans. There are monthly medications available to control these parasites and reduce the likelihood that your pets will be infected. Or try these: 5 Solutions for Natural Flea Control
  2. Heartworms are transmitted by mosquitoes, and they can infect dogs and cats. Even indoor pets aren't completely safe from heartworms: 25% of heartworm-infected cats live completely indoors. Heartworms damage the heart and lungs and can even cause death! You can purchase commercially-prepared heartworm preventatives to protect your pets, or check out this article on Natural Heartworm Prevention.
  3. Roundworms, hookworms, and other intestinal parasites can cause serious illness in pets and people. Vets can perform fecal tests that identify intestinal parasites and provide medications to safely and effectively control them, but here are some natural solutions to try first: Parasite and Worm Remedies.
10 Summer Care Tips For Dogs

Summer is here in full force and we know what that means. Beach time, vacations, cookouts and sunburns… We are constantly being reminded to stay cool, keep hydrated, and not to forget the sunblock. But also, let’s not forget about our pets. They are as susceptible to the sun and heat as we are. So here are a couple tips to keep your doggies cool and safe during these hot months.

  1. NEVER Leave Your Pet In The Car. This seems like a very obvious statement but every year some brain dead individual will leave their pets and/or their children in the car during the summer only to end up on the evening news. I DESPISE these acts of idiocy. You hate the heat? Well your dog does too! Even cracking the window does not allow enough air flow to keep your car cool in the summer and the heat can skyrocket to 120+ degrees in a matter of minutes. If you have to leave them in the car then they probably shouldn’t be going with you in the first place. It’s hot in there.
  2. HYDRATION, HYDRATION, HYDRATION! This should go without saying but animals get dehydrated as easily as we do and the more time they spend in the heat, the more care has to be given to ensure they are staying hydrated. Puppies, especially are like kids. They can play outside forever, get caught up in the fun, and forget to drink. Don’t let your pets overdue it. Keep them hydrated and force them to take time out from playing. Also, be aware of your breed. Giant breeds have a tendency to wear down quicker and can’t take as much play time as smaller dogs. Throw some ice in the water bowl from time to time. It’s refreshing for your pooch and the ice is stimulating for them.
  3. Pay Attention To Their Paws. We all know how hot asphalt, sand and concrete can get during the summer. Dogs are very susceptible to paw damage during these times. Dogs who regularly run outside will build up thick skin on the bottom of their paws that acts as a barrier to heat and rough terrain. If your pet spends most of their time indoors, they may not have had the opportunity to build of this callused pad and even a little bit of running on hot jagged terrain can cause some serious damage. Try to keep your dogs play time in a soft grassy area and regularly check their paws for cuts and damage. Most dogs will let you know if they are hurting, but stay on top of it. If light cuts occur, use an antibacterial wash and lightly apply a bandage. For deeper wounds be sure to take them to your vet. It’s important to keep nails trimmed as well so that they don’t get caught when they are running.
  4. Do Not Shave Your Dog! This is actually a pet peeve of mine. Just because you like your hair short or shaved during the summer, doesn’t necessarily mean this is the best idea for your pet. Dogs do not sweat through their skin like humans do… They pant. Their hair acts like an insulation during the winter AND summer months. By shaving your pet, they are more exposed to the sun and have a higher chance of getting sun burned. They also can’t cool down as readily. Regularly brush your pet to ensure excess hair isn’t causing any problems and leave their hair alone. If you must, just simply trim them.
  5. Identification Tags. Summer time brings vacations and many of us will be traveling with our pets. There is a greater risk of them getting away from us since their curiosity takes over in new places. Double check your pets identification tags to make sure all of the information is correct. If using a chip, ensure vet info and address is correct. Collar tags can disappear from time to time by getting caught on various objects of through rough play. Regularly check to make sure your dog is still carrying their tag.
  6. Sunscreen! Our pets are just as susceptible to the sun as we are. Sun can have the same damaging affects on their skin as it does on ours: burns, pain, peeling, cancer. Some dogs are more sensitive due to having lighter skin and fur. If your pet is going to be outside for any extended amount of time during the summer, slather up their noes and exposed areas first, including their tummies. And remember that lighter colored dogs need more sunscreen.
  7. Be Cautious On Humid Days. The humidity interferes with our pets ability to cool themselves. Through panting, the air that moves through the dogs nasal passage can pick up excess heat from their body and is expelled as they pant. High humidity decreases the effectiveness of them being able to rid themselves of the heat. On humid days take it easy or stay indoors.
  8. Protect Your Pet From Parasites, Fleas, And Ticks. Make sure they are on regular heartworm, flea and tick medication. Summer time is full of nasty bugs and if you don’t protect your pets they could come down with all kinds of parasites that could be detrimental to their health.
  9. Take Care With Swim Time. Just because your dog loves to swim does not mean he or she is a good swimmer. Always keep your eyes on your dog wether they are in a pool, at the beach, or in a lake. If they are comfortable wearing life preservers, then keep them on them while they are in the water. You could also provide a kiddie pool for your pet. They will love playing in the water, be able to cool off quickly and not worry about drowning.
  10. Watch Out For Heatstroke. I’ll keep this one simple. If you notice the following signs, seek medical attention for pet immediately and apply cold wet towels to their exposed areas in an effort to cool them down:
  • Excessive Panting
  • Staring
  • Anxious Expression
  • Refusal To Obey Commands
  • Warm, Dry Skin
  • High Fever
  • Rapid Heartbeat
  • Vomiting
  • Collapse

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Welcome to our new blog!

Posted by Lydia Shelley
Lydia Shelley
Your Website is your Business. If it's not working for you, it's working against you. Take a look at your comp...
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on Tuesday, 29 May 2012
in Lucky Dogs News & Views

Lucky Dogs would like to apologize to anyone who tried to leave comments on the former blog. The comments did not work, and neither did other aspects of that blog. We have a brand-new design now, and it has some great features. We can now spotlight a given blog post - or several. As you can see, it is sortable by category or tag; and there is a fantastic search function. There is also a "like" button for Facebook as well as "easy share" buttons other social media sites. We hope you will enjoy the improvements, and look forward to your long-awaited comments.

Note:

You must create an account in order to comment: this is to prevent spam. There is also a "captcha" image to further work toward that goal. The captcha image is CASE SENSITIVE.

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Happy Valentine's Day!

Posted by Annette Filecci
Annette Filecci
Hi, my name is Annette Filecci. I am a Miami native, one of the few! I have been pet sitting in the Hollywood,...
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on Tuesday, 29 May 2012
in Lucky Dogs Holidays

Tags: holiday

Farewell, Furry Friend!

Posted by Annette Filecci
Annette Filecci
Hi, my name is Annette Filecci. I am a Miami native, one of the few! I have been pet sitting in the Hollywood,...
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on Wednesday, 18 January 2012
in Lucky Dogs Farewells

Irmy on red doggie bedMy sweet Irmy,

We said goodbye to you today, just a few days short of your 14th birthday. I know I've said all this to you in the last few weeks, but I hope you somehow know I'm writing this, and maybe you'll sing me a song in heaven. Remember how you used to sing? I hear you got kicked out of a daycare for it, the people thought you were growling! Andy and Joanie taught you to do it on command, it was the coolest trick I'd seen.

Tags: dog, R.I.P.

Happy Holidays from Lucky Dogs!

Posted by Annette Filecci
Annette Filecci
Hi, my name is Annette Filecci. I am a Miami native, one of the few! I have been pet sitting in the Hollywood,...
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on Friday, 18 November 2011
in Lucky Dogs Holidays

Taking a trip? Going away for the holidays? Lucky Dogs has you covered, as always! Please reserve as early as possible so that we can plan our schedule well. We wish all of you and your families a safe, happy, and fun holiday season!

If you dress your furry kids up for holidays, or if you take pictures/videos of them with Santa/holiday décor: please send us your photos and/or videos, we would love to showcase them on our website! You can post them on our Facebook page too! Also, we are going to be adding a “dog of the month” feature to our website, so please send your photos and a short bio of your dog as soon as possible.

Tags: holiday

Happy Howl-o-ween!

Posted by Annette Filecci
Annette Filecci
Hi, my name is Annette Filecci. I am a Miami native, one of the few! I have been pet sitting in the Hollywood,...
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on Saturday, 24 September 2011
in Lucky Dogs Holidays

Tags: dog, holiday

The Afghan Hound

Posted by Annette Filecci
Annette Filecci
Hi, my name is Annette Filecci. I am a Miami native, one of the few! I have been pet sitting in the Hollywood,...
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on Wednesday, 27 April 2011
in Lucky Dogs Breed Profiles
There is nothing quite as elegant as the delicate and graceful bearing of an Afghan Hound. We begin this series of breed profiles with the aristocratic Afghan because we enjoy their regal bearing and playful, sometimes silly temperament. Two of our Lucky Dogs, Jackpot & Shakespeare are excellent examples of the breed.

Hallandale Pet Salon

Posted by Annette Filecci
Annette Filecci
Hi, my name is Annette Filecci. I am a Miami native, one of the few! I have been pet sitting in the Hollywood,...
User is currently offline
on Tuesday, 12 April 2011
in Lucky Dogs Spotlight
Have you been looking for a groomer? Connie Levin of Hallandale Pet Salon invites you to come for a visit. With over a decade of experience, Connie has a proven track record of making furry kids look their very best!


Hallandale Pet Salon also stocks pet supplies, including several brands of healthy pet food (Orijen - Acana - Wellness - California Natural - EVO – Innova; see photos), all grain-free and loaded with vital nutrients such as amino acids and omega-3 fatty acids.




Tags: groomers

April is Pet First Aid Month

Posted by Annette Filecci
Annette Filecci
Hi, my name is Annette Filecci. I am a Miami native, one of the few! I have been pet sitting in the Hollywood,...
User is currently offline
on Wednesday, 30 March 2011
in Lucky Dogs Healthy Pets

Do you know what to do if your pets get hurt? When your fur baby is unexpectedly injured, knowing (and having practiced!) some first aid basics can help stabilize them until you can reach your veterinarian. Do not take this lightly: quick and proper administration of first aid can even save your precious pet’s life. You can purchase various kits here* to help ensure you are prepared in such an emergency. Also, here in South Florida, you can visit this website* to learn about signing up for Pet First Aid and other CPR classes.

How often do you brush your teeth?

Posted by Annette Filecci
Annette Filecci
Hi, my name is Annette Filecci. I am a Miami native, one of the few! I have been pet sitting in the Hollywood,...
User is currently offline
on Thursday, 24 March 2011
in Lucky Dogs Healthy Pets

Would you let days, weeks, or even months go by without brushing your teeth? Of course not! Your dog can’t pick up a toothbrush and clean his own teeth: he relies on you. 80% (or more!) of dogs over three years old have gum disease. And it’s not only a problem for dogs – cats need dental care as well!

Tags: bad breath, dog, teeth

Chief Fletch

Posted by Annette Filecci
Annette Filecci
Hi, my name is Annette Filecci. I am a Miami native, one of the few! I have been pet sitting in the Hollywood,...
User is currently offline
on Tuesday, 06 July 2010
in Lucky Dogs Spotlight

Fletch is a welcome guest. He has been coming to stay with us when his dad goes away for about 2 yrs now. He is a Swiss Hound and loves to dig, play, swim and fetch. He is cuddly and sweet and just wants attention all the time - he's a big baby! We love his big floppy ears the best :)

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